The Ramblings of a Mad Man

Posts tagged “special operations

Special Forces PT Test (Upper Body Round Robin)

Get the UBRR Eight Week Workout E-Book by Stew Smith at http://www.refactortactical.com/Upper-Body-Round-Robin-UBRR-p/ssubrr.htm

The Upper Body Round Robin AKA the UBRR is a commonly used physical fitness test among many Tier I and Tier II Special Operations Units.  This pt test goes well beyond the typical scoring of pushups, sit-ups and a run.  Have you completed the UBRR?  Tell us how you did!  Send us a video of you completing the workout for a chance to get some free swag!

The UBRR events include:

Bench Press

Pushups

Situps

Pull-ups

Dips

Rope Climb

Kipp Up

Shuttle Run

5 Mile Run/Ruck

UBRR SCORING SYSTEM

Special Instruction:

As soon as an individual finishes one exercise, he must start the next exercise in no more than 10 minutes.

There is only one common standard for all age groups.

Only one attempt is allowed per participant at each station

In order to pass the UBRR, participants must achieve the following:

Pass all events with at least the minimum score, and Receive at least 1100 total points from all the events combined.

 

Bench press:

Time:  No time limit.

Minimum: 6 repetitions with the individuals body weight minus 20 percent of the individuals body weight is the minimum

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 3 points

The correct position is:  The individual will lay flat (supine) on the bench, feet flat on the floor, shoulder blades, head, and buttocks in contact with the bench.  Hands are approximately shoulder width apart.

A correct repetition is:  On the command, “Go”, the bar is pushed off the supports (first repetition only), and arms are extended fully to the locked position.  Then the bar is lowered until it touches the chest, and then raised until the arms are fully extended, elbows locked.

Grader position:  The grader must be located to one side of the individual doing the exercise to ensure the feet stay flat on the floor, the buttocks, shoulder blades and head stay in contact with the bench, and the arms fully extended.  The grader will notify the individual doing the exercise if the feet, buttocks, shoulder blades, or head lift do not maintain contact, or the arms don’t fully extend.  The repetition will not be counted after the second notification.

Example:            Individual weighs 180 pounds.

Minimum weight:  180lbs-36lbs (20% of 180) = 144 lbs

Individual presses 144 lbs 15 times.

Score = 100 points for minimum (6repetitions)

9 repetitions over minimum x 3 points per repetition for a total of 27 additional points (9 x 3 = 27).  Total score is 127 (100 points minimum and 27 points for additional points).

Push-ups:

Time:  1 minute

Minimum:  40 pushups is the minimum

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 2 points

The correct position is:  The back is generally straight, feet are up to 12 inches apart, hands are placed should width apart with arms extended and locked on a generally flat surface

A correct repetition is:  On the command, “Go”, the body is lowered from the front leaning rest position until the chest (sternum area) touches a flat hand on the floor, then the body is raised until the arms are fully extended (locked).

Grader position:  The grader will have one hand on the floor and the other on one elbow of the individual doing the exercise.  The grader will notify the individual doing the exercise if he needs to go lower or extend the arms fully, and will not count the repetition after the second notification

Stew Smith Push up

 

Sit-ups:

Time:  1 minute

Minimum:  40 sit-ups is the minimum

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 3 points

The correct position is:  The individual lies flat (supine) on his back on a generally flat surface.  The legs should have a 90 degree bend at the knees.  Feet should be flat on the floor with no more than 12 inches in between them, and at the same level as the upper body.  Fingers should be interlaced (one or more and at any part of the finger) and placed behind the head.

A correct repetition is:  On the command “Go” the individual raises his upper body by bending at the pelvis until the spine (base of the neck) breaks or equals the vertical plane (lower spine).  Then he lowers his body until the shoulder blades touch the floor.  The person holding the feet may secure them by any means, but will not be in the way or assist in the repetition.

Grader position:  The grader will be positioned perpendicular to the individual doing the exercise.  The grader will notify the individual doing the exercise if he needs to go higher or interlace the fingers and will not count the repetition after the second notification.

 

Pull-ups:

Time:  No time limit

Minimum:  6 pull-ups is the minimum

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 3.5 points

The correct position is:  The bar will be grasped with hands shoulder width apart, knuckles facing the individual.  The individual will hang from the bar so that the arms are fully extended (starting position).

A correct position is:  On the command “Go”, pull with the arms, raising the body until the chin is higher than the bar (head can be level or tilted back).  Then the individual will lower his body until he is hanging with arms fully extended.  The knees may be bent so the feet are behind the body, but the knees cannot come up in the front or kip in any way that would assist in the repetition.

Grader position:  The grader will stand 18 inches in front of the person doing the exercise and will count out loud.  If the individual touches the grader with any part of this body, that repetition will not count.  The grader will notify the individual doing the exercise if he needs to go higher or lock the arms, and will not count the repetition after the first notification.

Stud Pull Up Bar works great for the test/training

 

Dips:

Time:  No time limit.

Minimum:  10 dips is the minimum

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 2.5 points

The correct position is:  The body will be fully supported on the dip bar, arms fully extended and locked.  Legs may be bent or straight, and feet may be crossed.

A correct repetition is:  On the command “Go”, lower the body until the upper arms are parallel with the dip bar, and then press upwards with the arms until the arms are fully extended, elbows locked.

Grader position:    The grader will be positioned to one side of the individual to ensure the upper arms are at least parallel with the dip bar in the lower position, and the arms become fully locked in the up position.  The grader will notify the individual if he fails the go low enough, or if the elbows don’t lock.  He will not count the repetition after the second notification.

 

Rope climb:

Time: No time limit

Minimum:  Individual mist climb the rope (using any technique) until he can touch the designate height (the green tape at 20 feet) on the rope.  Individual will wear a 20 lb vest during this exercise.

Score:  This is a GO/NO GO event, and no points will be awarded.

 Kipp-up

Time:  One minute time limit

Minimum:  Six kipp ups is the minimum.

Score:  The minimum is 100 points.  Each additional repetition above the minimum is worth 3.5 points

The correct position is:  The individual will position himself underneath the pull-up bar as if he were doing a regular pull-up.  Do a left or right facing movement so the pull-up bar is now perpendicular to the individual.  Grasp the bar with palms facing each other, no more than 5” apart, arms fully extended and body hanging without touching the ground.

The correct repetition is:  On the command, “Go”, pull up with the arms and torso, raising the feet and legs, one leg on either side of the bar, until the heels touch above the bar, with the bar between the legs.  Then lower the legs until the arms and legs are fully extend in the starting position.  This is one repetition.

Grader position:  The grader will be located to one side or the other of the individual to ensure the arms and legs are fully extended to start each repetition.  The grader will also ensure that the heels touch above the bar on each repetition.  The grader will notify the individual if the individual fails to fully extend the arms or legs or fails to touch the heels above the bar.  He will not count the repetition after the second notification.

 

Shuttle Run:

Time:  24 seconds is the maximum time

Score:  The maximum is worth 100 points.  Each full 0.1 second under the maximum is worth 2 points.

A correct course is:  The course will be a pre-marked 25 meter running lane that is flat and without obstructions.  Easily visible lines on the ground will indicate the starting point and the 25 meter point.

A correct shuttle run is:  On the command “Go”, the individual doing the exercise will leave the start point and run down to the far end of the course, pick up a block, return to the start point and put that block down behind the line.  Then he will pick up a different block, return to the far end, put that block down behind the line, pick up a different block and return to the starting line.  The blocks must be placed behind the lines and carried by hand.

Grader position:  The grader will be positioned behind the starting line, and must use a watch that measures tenths of a second.

Example:            Individual’s time = 22.4 seconds

Time is 24 seconds or less (maximum) = 100 points

Total time under 24 seconds is sixteen 1/10th second increments

Score = 100 (maximum time) + (16 x 2) for tenths of a second

under the maximum for a total score of 132 points

 

Five Mile Run:

Time:  Maximum time is 40 minutes

Score:  The maximum is worth 100 points.  Every full 5 second increment under the maximum time is worth 2 points

A correct course is:  The course will be 5 miles in distance, with a paved (or similar) surface, generally flat and without obstacles.  The start and finish line will be the same.

A correct five mile run is:  On the command “Go”, the individual will begin to run at his own pace, and continue through the course until he crosses the finish line.  This exercise must be completed

Grader position:  The grader will be located at the start/finish line, and will begin the time at the command “Go”.  He will call off the finish times as runners cross the finish line, and he will not stop his watch until the last runner has completed the run.

 

Example:            Individuals time = 36:17

Time is 40 minutes or less (maximum) = 100 points

Total time under 40 minutes is 223 seconds

44 full 5 second increments x 2 points per increment = 88 points

(22 x 3 = 88)

Score = 100 (maximum time) + 88 (points for 5 second increments) for a total

Score of 188 points.

5 Mile Run

 

OR

 

Five Mile Rucksack March: 

Time:  The maximum time is 75 minutes

Score:  The maximum score is worth 100 points.  Every full time increment of 15 seconds under the maximum is worth 2 points.

Equipment:  The rucksack must weigh no less than 40 pounds dry.  Uniform can be pants or shorts with boots.

A correct course is:  The course will be 5 miles in distance, with a hard, solid surface, generally flat without obstacles.  The start and finish line will be the same.

A correct five mile rucksack march is:  Individual will begin at the start line, and at the command “Go”, will begin the ruckmarch at his own pace and continue through the course until he crosses the finish line.  This entire exercise must be completed with the rucksack, and un-aided.  Running is authorized.

Grader position:  The grader will be located at the start/finish line, and will start the time at the command “Go”.  He will call off the times as participants cross the finish line, and he will not stop the time until the last individual completes the rucksack march.

 

Example:            Individuals time is 52 minutes 35 seconds.

Time is 75 minutes or less (maximum) = 100 points

Total time under 75 minutes is 22 minutes and two 15 full seconds

22 minutes x 4 (15 second increments) = 88 + 1 (15 full second)

89 x 2 = 178

Score of 178 points

 

Click to Purchase the UBRR E-Workout Book

Click to Purchase the UBRR E-Workout Book

Looking to improve your UBRR Score?  Try the Eight Week Workout guide by Stew Smith available for immediate download at http://www.refactortactical.com/Upper-Body-Round-Robin-UBRR-p/ssubrr.htm

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A Sailor’s Perspective on the United States Army

From Hit the Woodline

Admiral William McRaven is, by anyone’s definition, a true warrior. A 36-year veteran of the US Navy, he earned his Special Operations credentials the hard way, first by completing the grueling selection and training program required of all men who aspire to become a Navy SEAL. He then went on to serve on the storied SEAL Team 6, and to command SEAL Team 3 before his appointment as commander of Special Operations Command Europe.

More recently, ADM McRaven commanded the Joint Special Operations Command, the most elite and complex SOF formation in the world. It was in this capacity that he became a household name as the commander of the raid that finally got Osama Bin Laden. Currently, Admiral McRaven directs all US Special Operations Forces as the commander of US Special Operations Command (SOCOM).

ADM McRaven had the opportunity to work with the Army on many occasions over the course of his career, and these interactions were the subject of the speech he delivered when he travelled to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York in January to be the Guest of Honor for an event known as “500th Night.” 500th Night marks an important milestone for the junior class of cadets: 500 days left until graduation and commissioning into the US Army.

ADM McRaven’s 500th Night speech, titled A Sailor’s Perspective on the United States Army, was transcribed and released by West Point. We edited West Point’s transcript slightly for purposes of readability and have provided it for you below. It is a lengthy read, but I assure you it is well worth it. The last five or so paragraphs are the most poignant.

Many of us on the Havoc13 team worked with ADM McRaven in the past and know that he is an impressive public speaker in addition to being an outstanding Special Operator, so it came as no surprise to hear that he gave a rousing and memorable speech at West Point. But the transcript of his comments shows the intelligence, insight, humility, and depth of experience that set him apart in a field crowded with talented warfighters.

In the last paragraph of his 500th Night speech, ADM McRaven says “there is no more noble calling in the world than to be a soldier in the United States Army.” That is high praise coming from any four-star officer, especially a man who made a career in the Navy. At the same time, though, it shows the deep respect that warriors have always had for each other, regardless of parochial differences. Substitute any branch of the Armed Services—Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps or the Coast Guard—into the statement that ADM McRaven made, and it would remain equally true. Service in the profession of arms IS a noble profession. The military is at the top of the “most trusted” institutions in the United States for a reason. It should be that way. May it always be so.

ADM McRaven’s 500th Night speech was powerful and inspiring to read, we can only imagine what it was like to hear it in person. We offer a salute, not just to ADM McRaven, not just to the US Army, but to ALL of the men and women who, fully knowing the hazards of their chosen profession, nonetheless suit up every day to protect our nation and our way of life. Thank you, and God bless.

____________________________________________________________________

A Sailor’s Perspective on the United States Army
Admiral William H. McRaven, Address to Class of 2015, 500th Night
18 January 2014

Good evening General and Mrs. Caslen, General and Mrs. Clarke, General Trainor, Col Brazil, Command Sergeants Major Duane and Byers, distinguished guests and most importantly Class of 2015. I am truly honored to be here tonight to address the future leaders of the United States Army.

But, as a graduate of a state school in Texas, who majored in journalism because I couldn’t do math, or science, or engineering or accounting, I am somewhat intimidated by the thought of giving any advice, to any cadet, on anything. Nevertheless, after almost 37 years in the service, much of that time with the Army, there may be something I can offer.

So tonight, as you begin the final 500 days of your time at the United States Military Academy, I would like to give you a Sailor’s Perspective on the Army; not the Army of the Hudson, not the Army of the history books, not the Army portrayed in the countless murals across campus, but the Army you will enter in 500 days—the Army upon which the future of the Nation rests; the Army that you will shape and the Army that you will lead. So, if you will humor this old sailor, I will tell you what I’ve learned in my time serving with the Army.

In the past twelve years I have worked for the great Generals of this generation; Dempsey, Petraeus, Odierno, McChrystal, Austin, Rodriguez and Dailey. All graduates of the Military Academy, each man, different in his own way.

Dempsey, a man of great humor and compassion, whose quick wit, and keen tactical sense allowed him to secure Baghdad as a Division Commander, lead the Central Command as a three star, and today, as the Chairman, he presides over the greatest change in our military since WWII and he does so with tremendous reason, intelligence and with a song in his heart.

Petraeus, whose understanding of the strategic nature of war was unparalleled. Who saw opportunity in every challenge and who dared greatly in hopes of great victories. His daily command decisions in Iraq and Afghanistan unquestionably saved the lives of thousands of young soldiers.

Odierno, a soldier’s soldier, who as a Division and Corps commander in Iraq, fought with a fierceness one would expect of a great warrior and then as the Commander of all forces in Iraq combined that fierceness with the diplomat’s subtle hand to lead and shape the future of a sovereign Iraq. And today, he leads the greatest Army the world has ever known.

Austin, the quiet bear of a man, whose deep intellect and incomparable combat experience allowed him to think through every complex problem and to succeed where others might have failed.

McChrystal, whose creative mind and intense drive for perfection, changed forever how special operations would fight on the battlefield and changed how SOF would forever be perceived by the Nation—and in doing so, likely changed the course of the Armed Forces as well.

Rodriguez, the everyman’s general who proved time and again, that character matters–that hard work, perseverance, persistence, and toughness on the battlefield are always traits of success.

And Del Dailey, whose boldness and innovation, coupled with a Night Stalkers sense of teamwork and aggressiveness, began the revolution in special operations.

What did I learn about the Army in watching these men and other great leaders like Keith Alexander, Chuck Jacoby, Mike Scaparrotti, John Campbell, Bob Caslen and Rich Clarke? Well, I learned first and foremost that your allegiance as an officer is always, always to the Nation and to those civilian leaders who were elected by the people, who represent the people.

The oath you took is clear; to support and defend the Constitution, not the institution– not the Army, not the Corps, not the division, not the brigade, not the battalion, not the company, not the platoon, and not the squad—but the nation.

I learned that leadership is hard. Karl von Clausewitz once said that “everything in war is easy, but the easy things are difficult.” Leadership sounds easy in the books, but it is quite difficult in real life. I learned that leadership is difficult because it is a human interaction and nothing, nothing is more daunting, more frustrating more complex than trying to lead men and women in tough times. Those officers that do it well earn your respect, because doing it poorly is common place. You will be challenged to do it well.

I learned that taking care of soldiers is not about coddling them. It is about challenging them . Establishing a standard of excellence and holding them accountable for reaching it. I learned that good officers lead from the front. I can’t count the times that I saw Petraeus, without body armor, walking the streets of Mosul, Baghdad or Ramadi, to share the dangers with his men and to show the enemy he wasn’t afraid.

Or McChrystal, jocking-up to go on a long patrol with his Rangers or SEALs in Afghanistan; Dempsey on a spur ride in Iraq; Austin at the head of his Division during the invasion of Iraq; Odierno, cigar in mouth, rumbling through the streets of Basrah; Rodriguez and Dailey always center stage during the tough fights in Iraq and Afghanistan.

I learned that if you are in combat, move to where the action is the hottest . Spend time with the soldiers being miserable, exhausted and scared. If you’re a Blackhawk pilot or a tank commander, spend some time on the flight line or in the motor pool with the maintainers and the wrench turners. Whatever position or branch you are in, find the toughest, most dangerous, job in your unit and go do it.

I learned that you won’t get a lot of thanks in return. I learned that you shouldn’t expect it. Your soldiers are doing the tough job every day, but I guarantee you, you will learn a lot about your troops and they will learn a lot about you.

I learned that the great leaders know how to fail. In the course of your Army career you will likely fail and fail often. Nothing so steels you for battle like failure. No officer I watched got it right, every time. But the great ones know that when they fail, they must pick themselves up, learn from their mistakes and move on.

Rudyard Kipling, the great British storyteller, poet and soldier once wrote, in part, “If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you. If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, but make allowances for their doubting too. If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two imposters just the same. Yours is the earth and everything that’s in it and which is more– you’ll be a man my son.”

If you can’t stomach failure, then you will never be a great leader. I learned that great Army officers are risk takers, but the greatest risk is not on the battlefield, but in standing up for what’s right.

I have seen a young lieutenant stand up to a colonel when that officer’s behavior was out of line. I have seen a captain challenge a general about a flawed battle plan. I have seen many a general privately confront their civilian leadership and question the merits of the national decisions. All Army officers are expected to take risks in battle. The truly great officers know that real victory is achieved when men and women of character take professional risks and challenge the weak – kneed, the faint of heart, the indecisive or the bullies.

And finally, in watching Army officers, young and old, I learned that the great officers are equally good at following as they are at leading. Following is one of the most underrated aspects of leadership and each of you will be asked to follow someone else. The strength of a good unit rests more on how well the officers follow the commander, than how well they lead their own soldiers. I have seen many a good Battalion and Company underachieve because someone in the officer ranks thought the Commander was incompetent and quietly worked to undermine his authority.

I guarantee you, that in the course of your career you will work for leaders whom you don’t like and don’t respect. It will be easy to make fun of their idiosyncrasies, their receding hair line, their soft chin or their spouse. Be very careful about getting too smug, too opinionated and too righteous. As long as the actions of y our commander are moral, legal and ethical, then do everything you can to support the chain of command and avoid the rolling eyes, the whisper campaigns and junior officer dissension.

I learned that the great Army officers know how to follow. And what about the soldiers that you will lead? In my career I have been fortunate to have served beside soldiers from the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Division, the paratroopers of the All American Division, the 1st Armored Division, the 1st Cavalry Division, the10th Mountain Division, the 1st, 3rd and 4th Infantry Division, all Groups of the Special Forces Regiment and my beloved Army Rangers.

I learned that the greatest privilege the Army can bestow upon you is to give you the opportunity to lead such magnificent men and women. These soldiers are not without their challenges. Your soldiers will, at times, question your authority. They will undermine your actions. They will mislead you, frustrate you, disappoint you, and occasionally fail you. But, when the chips are down, I mean really down, your soldiers will be there and they will inspire you with their courage, their sense of duty, their leadership, their love and their respect.

In difficult times, your soldiers will be everything you dreamed they would be—and more. All one has to do is look at the citations that accompany the actions of Sergeants Sal Giunta, Leroy Petry, Robbie Miller, Ty Carter, Jarad Monti, Ross McGinnis, Paul Smith, and Clinton Romesha. Men whose unparalleled heroism, above and beyond the call of duty, was only apparent moments before their brothers were threatened. I learned that your soldiers are at their best when their brothers and sisters in arms are threatened. They are at their best when life deals them the hardest of blows and their indomitable spirit shines through.

In 2007, I visited the intensive care unit in Landstuhl, Germany, where the Army was sending all of its most critically injured soldiers from Iraq. As I walked into the sterile room, clad from head to toe in clean white garb, a man lay naked on the bed in front of me. Missing one leg above the knee and part of the foot on the other leg, he was swollen beyond recognition from the blast of an IED.

The doctor in attendance didn’t know the man’s unit or service. I asked the man in the bed if he was a Marine or a Soldier. Unable to talk, he pointed to his thigh. There on what was left of his thigh, was a tattoo; the 1st Infantry Division. “You’re a soldier,” I remarked. He nodded. “An infantryman.” I said. He smiled through what was left of his face and then he picked up a clipboard upon which he had been writing notes. He looked me in the eye and wrote on the paper. “I –will—be— infantry—again!” Exclamation point. And somehow I knew that he would.

Just like the young Ranger in the combat hospital at Bagram who had both his legs amputated and was also unable to speak. The nurse at his bedside said that he knew sign language. His mother was deaf and the soldier had learned to sign at a young age. He was so very young and a part of me must have shown a small sign of pity for this Ranger whose life had just been devastated. With a picture of hand gestures in front of me, the Ranger, barely able to move and in excruciating pain, signed, “I will be okay.”

ADMIRAL WILLIAM MCRAVEN, COMMANDER OF US SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND, SPEAKS TO CADETS AT THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY ON 18 JANUARY (PHOTO CREDIT: USMA PAO)
And a year later I saw him at the Ranger Regimental Change of Command. He was wearing his prosthetic shorties, smiling from ear to ear and challenging the Rangers around him to a pull up contest. He was okay. Just like the young female sergeant who I just visited at Walter Reed this week. She was seriously injured in a parachute accident. With her father by her side, she laughed off the injury like it was a scratch. She’s been in the hospital for two months and has years of rehabilitation ahead of her. She has no self- pity, no remorse, no regrets, just determination to get back to her unit.

These soldiers and tens of thousands like them will be the warriors you lead in 500 days. You had better be up to the task, because I have learned that they expect you to be good. And, most importantly, I also learned that y our soldiers expect you to hold them to high standards. These soldiers joined the service to be part of something special and if they are not held to a high standard, if their individual efforts are no more important, no more appreciated than the efforts of a slacker then it will directly affect the morale of the unit.

And I learned that nothing is more important than the morale of a unit. MacArthur once said of morale, “…that it cannot be produced by pampering or coddling an Army, and it is not necessarily destroyed by hardship, danger, or even calamity…It will wither quickly, however, if soldiers come to believe themselves the victims of indifference or injustice on the part…of their leaders.”

The great leaders in the Army never accept indifference or injustice and they only judge their soldiers based on the merit of their work. Nothing else is important. Not the soldier’s size, not their color, not their gender, not their orientation, not their religion, not their ethnicity— nothing is important, but how well your soldiers do their job.

I am confident that history will reflect that the young American’s who enlisted in the Army after September 11th, were equal in greatness to their grandfathers and their great grandfathers who fought in the World Wars—and in 500 days you will inherit these incredible soldiers. Be ready.

Finally, in watching the Army for most of my career, I learned that no institution in the world has the history, the legacy, the traditions, or the pride that comes from being a soldier. I am envious beyond words. I learned that whether you serve 4 years or 40 years you will never, ever regret your decision to have joined the United States Army. You will serve beside the finest men and women in America. You will be challenged every day.

You will fail. You will succeed. You will grow. You will have adventures to fill ten life times and stories that your friends from home will never be able to understand. Your children and their children and their children’s children, will be incredibly proud of your service and when you pass from this earth, the Nation that you served so very well will honor you for your duty. And your only regret will be that you could not have served longer.

And if for one moment you believe that because Iraq is over and Afghanistan is winding down that the future holds few challenges for you, then you are terribly, terribly mistaken. Because as long as there are threats to this great Nation, the Army upon which this Nation was founded, will be the cornerstone of its security, it’s freedom and its future. And you, as Army Officers, will shape that future, secure our freedoms and protect us from harm.

So what has this sailor learned? That there is no more noble calling in the world than to be a soldier in the United States Army. Good luck to you all as you complete your final 500 days. May God bless America and may we always have the privilege to serve her. Thank you very much.

____________________________________________________________________

-Havoc13

havoc13team@gmail.com

(photos, transcribed comments, and 500th Night details credited to West Point PAO)